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The Telegraph online | Debris of the old in the new

The Telegraph online | Debris of the old in the new

Sheetal Gattani

New Canvases — that’s the simple title, shorn of thematic references. But the new canvases of Sheetal Gattani, presented by Chemould Prescott Road, Mumbai, at its recent show — both in the gallery and online — overturned the very idea of ‘new’ being virgin, untarnished territory. The discoloured, damaged, degraded epidermis of her canvases, astir with intimations from underneath, implied the persistence of a past that subverts brash pretensions to newness. Because every ‘now’ comes with its embedded debris of ‘then’. And it’s the texture, speckled with clues of weathering, that imports a meditative gravity into her work.

African Arts | Hidden Elements

African Arts | Hidden Elements

Victor Ekpuk's Illustrations for the Daily Times of Nigeria

By Janine A. Sytsma

African Arts, Winter 2021, Vol. 54, No. 4, pg. 38-51

 

Ekpuk’s scribbling from the mid-1990s similarly oscillates between transparency and secrecy. Some signs may be familiar to those with a basic knowledge of nsibidi, other African ideographic systems, Nigerian current affairs, and global popular culture, while others come tantalizingly close but ultimately refuse to reveal themselves and supply any specific meaning to the narrative. Indeed, even those examples with clear reference points may possess additional content known only to Ekpuk. In his scribbling-based illustrations, the combination of scripts with different levels of opaqueness accordingly generates characteristically expansive and generative analyses. The more recognizable scripts, interspersed throughout the composition, serve as signposts for discourse, revealing potential deviations from the article’s position and, according to Ekpuk (Kreamer and Purura 2007: 234), helping “to unlock the deeper layers of each composition.” The remaining signs then build on the identifiable examples and facilitate continued nonstructured contemplation of both the article along and interconnected issues, only alluded to in the text. When the illustration is experienced holistically, as Ekpuk intended, the commentary steadily accumulates, with each new layer forming connections with previous layers to generate new interrelated interpretations. (pg. 46-47)

Apollo | In the studio with...Salman Toor

Apollo | In the studio with...Salman Toor

"Born in Lahore and based in New York, the painter Salman Toor depicts the lives of queer, South Asian men in imagined surroundings that draw as much from the Old Masters as they do from the modern metropolis. Toor’s scenes are often casual – his figures dance at house parties and stare into smartphones – but always meticulously composed. After his first solo museum show, ‘How Will I Know’, took place at the Whitney, New York, in 2020–21, Toor has recently completed a residency at the Frick Madison, New York, as part of its ‘Living Histories: Queer Views and Old Masters’ programme; the work Toor has completed, ‘Museum Boys’, responds to two paintings by Vermeer in the Frick, and is currently on view at the museum alongside them."

Telegraph India | With River of Faith, Jayasri Burman goes back to the roots of her inspiration

Telegraph India | With River of Faith, Jayasri Burman goes back to the roots of her inspiration

"For millennia now, the Ganges has been revered and disregarded in equal measure, much like women themselves. Yet somehow, she still flows as she nurtures and ensconces generations in the subcontinent, with every bend she takes. More recently, she has also put up with the ineptitude of the human race as she gave refuge to abandoned, nameless casualties of the pandemic. This and more have been a source of insatiable inspiration and curiosity for artist Jayasri Burman since her childhood, which has now culminated into a show of enormous scale called River of Faith."

domus | American Pastoral

domus | American Pastoral

Bernardo Siciliano

"At the Aicon Gallery in New York, Bernando Siciliano’s works of art, explicitly inspired by Philip Roth, immortalise the moments that narrate these two pandemic years."

India Today | Paresh Maity Interview

India Today | Paresh Maity Interview

Artist Paresh Maity Speaks to India Today About his Latest Art Exhibition in Kolkata

The Observer | "Picturing Motherhood Now" at CMA reimagines our deepest connections

The Observer | "Picturing Motherhood Now" at CMA reimagines our deepest connections

Mequitta Ahuja

"The first piece in the hall is Mequitta Ahuja’s 2020 oil painting entitled “Portrait of Her Mother,” a gentle rendition of the artist’s studio with Ahuja standing in the foreground, her body turned slightly away as though she is torn between us and her work. Two striking portraits in vibrant reds and blues loom behind her, but their presence is overshadowed by the sketch Ahuja holds up for us to see—the pearly paper shining from the center of the canvas. Etched upon it is a drawing of Ahuja’s mother—the two of them share many striking features, from their sharp cheekbones, to the curve of their noses, to the nearly imperceptible tilt of their heads. It is quite a homage carved out of a single instant, with the smallest moments immortalizing a mother’s impact."

The News-Herald | Cleveland Museum of Art's new exhibition 'Picturing Motherhood Now' focuses on role through wide, contemporary lens

The News-Herald | Cleveland Museum of Art's new exhibition 'Picturing Motherhood Now' focuses on role through wide, contemporary lens

“‘Picturing Motherhood Now’ emerged during the global pandemic and in the wake of the murder of George Floyd and the important conversations about race that followed,” Liebert says. “I think these world events did inflect the show. They inevitably shaped the way artists were thinking, and the issues that were on the minds of our catalog contributors.”

The News International | Fire in the Soil

The News International | Fire in the Soil

Khadim Ali

"What Now My Friend?, curated by Salima Hashmi at Aicon Gallery, New York (December 17–January 23) denotes the perpetual saga of strife between the oppressors and the oppressed. Employing the metaphor of Rustom and Sohrab from the illustrations of Shahnameh Ali narrates the current political, racial and religious contradictions. In the exhibition, his large-scale tapestries portray the presence of power and map the conflict between countries, besides describing the latest calamities, such as Covid-19."

Artnet News | Baltimore Artist Mequitta Ahuja on How Her New Exhibition is an Ode to Motherhood and Loss

Artnet News | Baltimore Artist Mequitta Ahuja on How Her New Exhibition is an Ode to Motherhood and Loss

January 11, 2021

“Ma”, the artist’s new exhibition at New York’s Aicon Gallery, includes 20 oil sketches and five large oil paintings. The works may be the artist’s most intimately personal yet—made over the past 15 months, during the final period of her mother Sonja’s life, the works are a form of grieving. Loss, healing, gratitude, and connection exist as interconnected and equal energies.

Cornell Business Review: Fall 2020 | Observing the Art World from Six Feet Away

Cornell Business Review: Fall 2020 | Observing the Art World from Six Feet Away

Pages 32-35

"The difficulty of having a show during this time is that the atrocities in the world today make it difficult to have any kind of celebration while so many around the world find themselves in mourning, but I suppose that revelation is a continuous need. I wish that people could come and enjoy it with me but I understand that that's not possible at the moment."

The New York Times | 3 Art Gallery Shows to See Right Now

The New York Times | 3 Art Gallery Shows to See Right Now

Sonja Ferlov Mancoba | Ernest Mancoba

09/30/2020

"If museums are serious about globalizing their collections, it won't do just to pick out a few Africans or Asians or Latin Americans whose art superficially resembles what the West already approbates. Art history has to be preconceived as a perpetual migration of artists, images and ideas - across oceans, across decades. A sterling case study awaits in the upstairs space of Aicon Gallery, displaying the lean, precise, calligraphic abstractions of Ernest Mancoba (1904 - 2002), a South African painter who spent his career in Denmark and France."

artdaily.org | Solo Exhibition of the Early Work of Seasoned New York Artist Natvar Bhavsar Opens at Aicon Art

artdaily.org | Solo Exhibition of the Early Work of Seasoned New York Artist Natvar Bhavsar Opens at Aicon Art

Natvar Bhavsar | Sublime Light

"Aicon Art New York brought us through Natvar Bhavsar: Beginnings (March 1-April 6, 2019) an astonishing show on this Indian-American artist’s early color-field paintings. Now, by giving us Natvar Bhavsar: Sublime Light from September 26-October 31, 2020, the gallery is spotlighting his paintings from the late 1970s through the 1980s. They astonish us equally. Though each painting is a world unto itself, they have a common magical quality. They transport you to a realm beyond yourself and the world in which you have presence."

ARTFORUM: Alpesh Kantilal Patel on Natvar Bhavsar

ARTFORUM: Alpesh Kantilal Patel on Natvar Bhavsar

"There’s something about the sonorousness of the language and the richness of his color fields that connects somehow. Overall, Bhavsar’s works bring out color’s metaphysical aspects and, via his use of raw pigment, its profound physicality."

Hyperallergic Review

Hyperallergic Review

Rekha Rodwittiya | The Rituals of Memory: Personal Folklores and Other Tales

02/18/2016

"Rekha Rodwittiya’s iconic female figures loom large. An amalgamation of Indian classical and tribal images, Rodwittiya’s asexual goddesses evade easy categorization. Currently in her solo exhibition Rituals of Memory at Aicon Gallery, they command an uncanny presence and beg scrutiny."http://hyperallergic.com/276736/talismanic-and-tenacious-goddesses-that-resist-femininity/

The American Bazaar

The American Bazaar

Rekha Rodwittiya | The Rituals of Memory: Personal Folklores and Other Tales

02/04/2016

"Prominent Baroda-based feminist artist Rekha Rodwittiya, who is the founder of The Collective Studio Baroda, is back here after two decades with a major exhibition at the Aicon Gallery, ‘The Rituals of Memory: Personal Folklores and Other Tales’, which runs from Feb. 4 through Feb. 27th."

OCULA Conversations

OCULA Conversations

Rasheed Araeen

"Rasheed Araeen should not need an introduction: he is one of the foremost pioneers of Minimalist sculpture in Britain. And yet, (with his first exhibition in Asia taking place now at Rossi & Rossi, Hong Kong), that there is a need to introduce Araeen refers to something that has driven at least part of this artist's 50-year career."

International Gallerie Profile

International Gallerie Profile

Salman Toor | Resident Alien

12/01/2015

"New York City has facilitated my cobbling together of seemingly divergent understandings of developing societies seething in turmoil, along with the microcosms of cultures like Brooklyn’s art scene. Since I left Lahore, my work has developed in more abstract directions in order to host and superimpose imagined narratives and homelands in which personal and global concerns intersect.”